Haywood Co creeks,lakes and river

Rivers, Creeks and Springs

There are numerous streams running through the county, but very few of them are lasting. They furnish a plentiful supply of water during the winter, early in the spring and very late in the fall, but at other seasons they do not afford running water. They have generally along their beds ponds which hold water during the greater part of the year. The following are worthy of mention: Nixon’s Creek rises four miles north-east of Brownsville, runs rather north of west, and empties into Forked Deer River ten miles north-west of Brownsville. Welch’s Creek rises one-half mile north of Brownsville, runs north, and empties into Nixon’s Creek four miles north of Brownsville. Walker’s Creek rises two miles south-west of Brownsville, ranges north-east, and empties into Welch’s Creek two miles north of Brownsville. Meridian Creek rises four miles west of Brownsville, ranges north, and empties into Nixon’s Creek eight miles north-west of Brownsville. Brier Creek rises eight miles north of Brownsville, ranges north-west, and empties into Meridian Creek nine miles north-west of Brownsville. Otter Creek rises twelve miles west of Brownsville, ranges north, and empties into Forked Deer River fourteen miles north-west of Brownsville. All these streams are on the north side of the ridge, and with the exception of Meridian Creek, which is perennial, they afford running water only during the winter and late in the fall.

The following streams are on the south of the ridge, and are either directly or indirectly tributaries of Hatchie River: Brown’s Creek rises twelve miles south-cast of Brownsville, runs south-west, and empties into Hatchie River eight miles south-east of Brownsville. Lick Creek rises a few miles south-east of Brownsville, ranges southwest, and empties into Hatchie River seven miles south-east of Brownsville. Sugar Creek rises near the south-eastern corporation line of Brownsville, ranges south-west, and empties into Hatchie River six miles south-west of Brownsville. Bradford’s Creek rises six miles south-west of Brownsville, runs south-west, and empties into Hatchie River ten miles south-west of Brownsville. Lagoon Creek rises ten miles west of Brownsville, ranges south-west, and empties into Hatchie River fourteen miles south-west of Brownsville, in Lauderdale county. Poplar Creek rises about fourteen miles south-east of Brownsville, near the Fayette county line, runs south-east, and empties into Hatchie River five miles south of Brownsville. Big Muddy Creek rises in Fayette county, fifteen miles south of Brownsville, ranges north-west, and empties into Hatchie River twelve miles south-west of Brownsville. Little Muddy Creek rises ten miles south-east of Brownsville, runs north-west, and empties into Big Muddy Creek eight miles south-west of Brownsville. Richland Creek rises in the edge of Hardeman county, fifteen miles south-east of Brownsville, ranges north-west, and empties into Hatchie River seven miles south-east of Brownsville.

The following rivers are the only two which pass through the county: Hatchie River enters the south-eastern corner of the county from Hardeman county, ranges rather north of west, and passes out of the county so as to form the dividing line between the counties of Lauderdale and Tipton. North Forked Deer River enters the north- eastern corner of the county from Madison county, ranges north-west, and passes out of the county so as to form the dividing line between the counties of Lauderdale and Dyer.

There are very low springs in the county, and none are large, or afford mineral water. In the vicinity of Brownsville thev are more frequent than in any other section.

Lakes

Haywood county abounds in lakes, as will be seen from the following enumeration and description: Wesley’s Lake, eight miles south-west of Brownsville, is about one and a half miles long, 300 yards wide and from three to ten feet deep; it is three-fourths of a mile from Hatchie River, is full of clear, cold water, and is surrounded by a vigorous growth of cypress trees, though the lake itself is free from trees. Powell’s lake is six miles south-cast of Brownsville, is one mile long, 150 yards wide, and from three to ten feet deep. Swan Lake and Hardwick Lake are smaller bodies of water, in the same neighborhood as Powell’s Lake. All of the lakes mentioned are south of Hatchie River, but the following are north of that stream: Horseshoe Lake, five miles south-west of Brownsville, is one mile long, 100 yards wide, and from five to twelve feet deep. Long Lake is half a mile below Horseshoe Lake, is three-fourths of a mile long, 100 yards wide and from three to eight feet deep. Drain Lake is one- fourth of a mile below Long Luke, is about one mile long, 150 yards wide and from four to twenty feet deep. All of these lakes abound in fish, of which the predominating varieties are buffalo, blue cat, white, black and sun perch, drum and jack. Another very singular body of water is Moore’s Lake, which is four and a half miles south-west of Brownsville, is half a mile long, 100 yards wide, and from four to eight feet deep. Its bottom abounds in springs, and the water of the lake is icy cold; in fact it is so cold as to be unpleasant for those who might wish to sein it. It is not regarded as favorable for fishing, as it abounds in pike fish, which are not much esteemed, and are very destructive to other fish. The rest of the lakes are much frequented by picnic and fishing parties. They are very clear and attractive, are surrounded with beautiful grasses and grateful shade, and in the neighborhood of all of them are numerous springs

 

for more information  check out:

Haywood County
Genealogy and History

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