MADISON CO CREEKS AND RIVERS

Madison Co Creeks

dn English

Rivers and Creeks.
There are other counties in West Tennessee which are better watered than Madison, but it has running through it a goodly number of streams, which supply plenty of water for ordinary purposes. The following are deserving of mention: Middle Fork of Forked Deer River enters the county in the north-eastern corner, from Carroll county, runs south-west, passes almost entirely through the northern part of the county and enters Gibson county about sixteen miles north-west of Jackson. South Fork of Forked Deer River enters the county from Henderson county, near the southeast corner, runs nearly west, and passes into Haywood county, fifteen miles north-west of Jackson and near the boundary line of Crockett. Little Middle Fork of Forked Deer River rises in Henderson county, passes into Madison a little south of the center of the line dividing Henderson and Madison, runs west and empties into the South Fork of Forked Deer, four miles east of Jackson. Greer’s Creek rises about eight miles north-east of Jackson, ranges south and empties into Little Middle Fork of the Forked Deer, seven miles east of Jackson. Jones Creek rises about three and a half miles north-east of Jackson, runs south and empties into the South Fork of Forked Deer, one and a fourth miles south-east of Jackson. Johnson’s Creek rises about one and a half miles south of Jackson, runs north-west and empties into the South Fork of Forked Deer, six miles west of Jackson. Cub Creek rises about eight miles south-west of Jackson, runs northwest and empties into the South Fork of Forked Deer, thirteen miles northwest of Jackson. Big Black, Clover and Turkey creeks do not rise in the county, but pass through portions of it, the two first emptying into Hatchie River in Haywood county, the last named emptying into the Forked Deer, twelve miles south-east of Jackson. Dyer Creek rises two miles north of Jackson and is a tributary of Middle Fork (locally North Fork) of Forked Deer River. The larger streams in the county are lasting and afford milling facilities, though a majority of them have sluggish currents with unstable banks. The water of the county is freestone. On Turkey Creek in the southeast part of the county chalybeate springs are met with.

From “Goodspeed History”1886

The streams of the county are all comparatively small, shallow and sluggish. With the exception of Big Black and Clover Creeks, which are tributaries of the Hatchie, the streams all belong to the Forked Deer system. Middle Fork, of Forked Deer, enters the county from Carroll near the northeast corner of the county, and passes southwesterly through the county and enters Gibson County about sixteen miles northwest from Jackson. South Fork, of Forked Deer, enters what was the southeast corner of the county, and passes in a western direction out of the county. Little Middle Fork enters Madison at a little south of the center on the eastern line of the county, and unites with South Fork about four miles east of Jackson. Greer Creek is a small tributary of Little Middle Fork. Turkey, Jones, Johnson and Cub Creeks are tributaries of South Fork. Dyer Creek, which rises about two miles north of Jackson, empties into Middle Fork of Forked Deer River. From their shallow beds these streams are subject to frequent overflows. Mill sites have been established on the more favorable of these streams since the organization of the county

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