HART’s BRIDGE ROAD

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GHOST OF HARTS BRIDGE ROAD

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In 2004. at the third presentations of “the ghost of downtown Jackson” I met a very interesting lady.

After finishing my stories a young  lady came up and ask if I could over and meet her grandmother. The young lady led me to a bench in front of City Hall.I did and this is the story I was told about the headless ghost of Harts Bridge.

“I am so glad to meet you” she said “ I want to tell you what  my grandmother told me that her mother told her. Come on sit beside me.” (Have you noticed when an older person ask you to sit on bench or a chair beside them they pat the place they want you to sit. Now that I am older I do the same thing.)By this time there about 20 people gathered around as we listened to her memories.

“The time was the 1930’s my grandparents always had their granddaughters out for a weekend. There were 10 of us girl cousins all but two of us were from Jackson the others were from Nashville. On Friday afternoon their  parents would bring them down deliver them to my grandparents where we all met for family diner . Then the adults and the boys would head off to Jackson until Sunday.   

Saturday morning all my great aunts would come over and we started cooking for the Sunday picnic. Then granddaddy would come get us and we fish in the pond and then we help build a fire pit. On Saturday night we would go down to fire pit roast marshmallows and hot dogs. There would be a small campfire with a large pot of hot chocolate  with our “tin cups”  on the side and a Dutch oven full of hoe cakes.” She looked around “ you youngins don’t know what hoe cakes are do you?”

This is her explanation . “In the pioneer days they always had a special clean hoe. Then they would mix cornmeal,  a little bit 

of lard, and water. Then they put the batter on the hoe and  into the fire and cook repeat until they had enough 

hoe cakes  for the family.” She laughed “ now my granny cooked her’s in a skillet on the stove and put them in the Dutch oven to keep them warm. They were to wrap our hot dogs in there was always a bowl of mustard and butter. You have never had a burnt hot dog until you have had it in a hoe cake with melted butter.” She explained 

(We lost her there for a second I knew she was going back to that campfire.)

Then she said they would wrap in their blankets by the fire and listen to granny tell us ghost stories. The favorite was the headless ghost of Harts Bridge Road.

“ The year was 1864 men were coming back from the war to start over. Down the road from where my grandmother lived there was a house where one of the daughter in laws of one of the neighbor landowner lived. Their son  had joined the war effort late  his wife was already settled in so she stayed.

Grandmother told us she was poplar and had a lot of men visitors. The neighbors all talked about this but not when we children in the room but we knew.

Well the young man came home from war by train .His family had arranged for him to have a horse waiting for him at one of the local stables. Since he got to Jackson early he went to one of the  saloons downtown before he headed home. 

While he was there one of friends informed him what his wife had been up to in his absence. 

On his way he came up with plan. He stopped by his parents and told them he was planning on moving to Nashville to work there and start over with his wife. They did not like it but they understood. He got a wagon with a couple of horses and took off for his house and his unfaithful wife.

As he approached the house the wife heard the wagon approach. Her gentleman friend fled out the back door to the woods where his horse was hidden.

The husband parked the wagon and went inside to find his wife standing at the stove. He did not wait for her to turn around he took his long sword and cut off her head. Then he rolled up her body and his sword in the rug that was in front of the fireplace. Next he got out her trunk and packed her clothes and her fancy hat in the trunk. He took her hat box and placed her head in it wrapped in towels. He then loaded up the furnishing he wanted to take and his clothes. Last he loaded the rug and the hat box and a shovel.

From his house he road down to the Forked Deer Bottoms close to where  the bridge is now. First he threw the hat box with the head in the River. Then he went deeper in the woods and dug a shallow grave and dumped the rug and the headless body in the grave. He covered it with leaves and branches.

He then left headed North. About a year later he  sent word that his wife had died in child birth.

Then it started being reported a headless woman appeared walking the banks of the Forked Deer River on full moon nights. Was she looking for her husband or her head?  Sometimes she would be seen swinging his sword.”

Then my grandmother would laugh a horrible scary laugh.

“ We girls would be shaking under our blankets 

but it would be a good scary. We loved our time with 

our Grandparents . The next day we went to church as a family then had a wonderful family reunion. On the way home my dad asked “did she tell you the story?” and laughed.

Her granddaughter help her up she gave me a great grandmother hug. I thanked her for story as I watched her walk away. The  group that enjoyed the story started clapping I joined in the lady stopped and took a bow. Such a wonderful night.

For years people have been to the Harts Bridge Road close to the bridge they would pull off and look for the headless woman. Some have reported seeing her on one side of the river then others would see a head of a woman stuck in a tree.

Others said they just had a good make out session.

You have to admit it is a great story and it has been passed down through the years different versions but the same results a headless woman walking the banks of the Forked Deer River or in the woods .

Are around Hart’s Bridge Rd. Forked Deere River

HILLVILLE

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Here are some more Haywood Co. Tennessee facts followed by a story about spirits that are still close to their homes..

HILLVILLE: Located in southern part of county and first called Moore’s as the first elections were held in Alfred Moore’s home. Later it was named Hillville for Fountain P. Hill in whose home the post office was established. Mt. Pleasant United Methodist Church, “Do-Me-Good,” was organized circa 1830. Hillville was a stage coach stop between Nashville and Memphis and the coach crossed Hatchie River by ferry at Estanaula. A Chickasaw Indian Burial Ground is located here and is now part of Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge.*

Mt Pleasant United Methodist Cemetery another beautiful historic cemetery.

This story was shared with me years ago by a gentleman(Mr. Edwards) who hung around Grandfather’s store. I remember this story because it was during the time they were constructing the “interstate”.

Mr. Edwards  was from the Hillville community a hunter and a fisherman. His family he told me arrived in the Hillville area in 1835. He said his grandfather told him this story when he was a little boy. 

Hillville was one of the stops on the stage coach route from Nashville to Memphis in the 1840’s . His grandfather told him there was an Inn for the travelers to have a meal or even spend the night. They would trade out the horses for the next part of their journey, From Hillville they would cross the Hatchie  River at Estanaula by ferry. Estanaula at that time had a hotel and several other businesses. Lumber ,cotton and other goods were shipped and received at this location.   

Since there would be a lot of money trading hands this made this area a prime site for robbers.

According to Mr. Edwards there was on gang that terrified the area for a few years. Finally the plantation owners, lumberman and concerned citizens formed a vigilante group . Then one day they caught the gang in the act of terrifying a group on a stage coach. After they got the stage on it’s way they took the guilty parties and hung them from the trees in the Hatchie Bottom. Far enough in the bottoms no one would see them hanging.

The robberies stopped but odd sightings and sounds could be heard in the area the men were hung. It was said the hanging trees died and the area would not grow vegetation. The moans of the hanging men can still be heard according to what Mr Edward’s grandfather told him.

Mr. Edwards said he and his friends would go looking for the site but every time they got close something would scare them off. They were told Mr. Powell’s  men would not go close to the area when they were harvesting lumber.

He just laughed and said “this is just one of the stories that would curl your hair”. 

Sometime I will share some of the other stories I heard siting by the stove in “Pop’s store.

* https://tngenweb.org/haywood/cities-towns-communities/

THE VOICE OF AN ANGEL

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Little known facts about Haywood Co. TennesseeI

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The Dancyville Methodist Cemetery was established in 1830’s. If your interested you can roam the cemetery and see if you can find interesting tombstones. I was always told by Miss Dorothy Moore that there was a 1813 veteran buried there,  also veterans from Spanish American war, WWI,WWII, ex slaves, 1 gypsy and many everyday citizens. It was always interesting to walk around and write down the various names and dates but never at night.

The town was named after the local blacksmith Issac Dancy in 1837. The state in 1838 began the plans for a road from Fayette Co. through Dancyville to Brownsville. 

This is a round about way to tell you about the one of the ghost that wanders the area.

The lady was part of a group of gypsies that had purchased land outside Dancyville. They use this farm as a base camp and traveled around West Tennessee and Northern Mississippi. A group would travel,   pick up odd jobs, put on shows and of course set up a fortune telling tent. Then in the winter come back to the home place

share what they earned and get ready for the next outing.

The group that stayed behind ran the farm where they grew crops and all sorts of herbs. They earned  money other ways around the neighborhood They had a blacksmith business , worked as carpenters and field hands. One of the ladies was known far and wide as a talented fortune teller and healer.

Ladies of the area would come to find out there future and to get potions. Unlike other areas the gypsies were accepted in this part of Haywood County. 

The fortune tellers daughter  was a striking beauty with the voice of an Angel. She and her family attended the Methodist church where she sang in the choir. 

One night she and her brother were leaving choir practice and a storm came out of nowhere . A tree fell on their buggy she was killed instantly her brother died going for help.

It is said that her spirit still can be seen in the area of the cemetery  and if you listen you can hear her singing her favorite hymns at night after a funeral. 

Ghost of the little girl

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THE LITTLE GIRL AT THE RAILROAD DEPOT

BROWNSVILLE, TN

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In 1856 the railroad tracks reached Brownsville. The first Memphis and Ohio train arrived carrying freight, mail and passengers. The train came from Memphis to Brownsville then did a turn a round and head back to Memphis. It was said the train left Brownsville and arrived in Memphis six hours later.The reason was because of the many stops loading and unloading freight ,mail and passengers.

It wasn’t until 1906 when the first train station was completed that the sightings began.

In 1905 a young girl got on the train with her mother to go to Memphis the mother fell asleep. When the train arrived in Memphis the mother woke up and her daughter was no where to be found. Panic ensued they search the train from one end to the other.

Then someone reported they had seen the girl get off in Stanton. Family members searched to no luck . Then when the train station opened in 1906 the sightings started .

After the Memphis train left the station people said they would see a little sitting on the steps of the station crying and then she wasn’t there.

It was not until a year later they found the body of a little girl in an abandoned telegraph house near Stanton. They identified her by the doll that was with her. The young girl had been kidnapped by a lady known to have lost her little girl in 1904. The lady had admitted the deed in a note found when they discovered her hanging from a tree behind her house. They think the little girl had escaped and was walkings down the tracks to Brownsville. She had taken shelter in the telegraph house and died.

The reason she appeared at the train station she was waiting on her mother because that was the last time they had been together. When the station was torn down in 1971 everyone thought that would be the end of the sightings.

Not so I have been told on a full moon night you can see a faded set of steps and there she sits holding her doll and crying..

This story was told me by my great Aunt Vera when I was a child. I think it was to scare me not to “take up with strangers” .

It worked and I never forgot

STRANGE SIGHTINGS

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Strange Sightings

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First I want to confirm that I am a supporter of Solar energy.

This story is a what if story.

It was an exciting time for Haywood County the land had been purchased and the site was being developed. This was going to be the site of a large solar farm providing power to many. There was some environmental concerns but they were brushed aside “for the good of the people”.

Fast forward the solar farm was up and going even had been enlarged all was running smoothly. Or was it?

 For the past few years there had been rumors of strange sightings in Hatchie . Large Bobcats and monster alligator gar.

(Gars are known for their long dart-shaped bodies. They inhabit slow-moving and stagnant water bodies, such as bayous and estuaries. In these habitats they frequently bask like logs at the surface. Gars have the ability to gulp air in response to low-oxygen conditions that often occur in sluggish waters. The air is delivered to a type of primitive lung called a gas bladder or air-breathing organ, which is vascularized to allow for gas exchange with the body. Their jawsand face form a sharp-toothed beak, and their bodies are encased in an armour of diamond-shaped, thick, enameled (ganoid) scales.)

Everyone who lived close to the Hatchie had seen or caught Gar if caught they were released.  But the sightings we are talking about were up to six feet long and weighing over 100 lbs and they were causing  all sorts of problems in the Bottoms. Then there were the 

Bobcats, rabbits and squirrels oversized and very aggressive. The question was why and what was causing these problems.

One day a Forest Ranger was doing a check of a section of Hatchie bottom. What he found was not normal. He found a clearing that had not been there before. In this clearing was one of the huge solar panels. It was less than 50 ft of the river on a built up mound.

The trees around the clearing were twice as big as they had been the last  time he had checked . According to his journal it was just over

18 months ago that he was in this area. He recorded what he was seeing then he heard the sound a low growl like he had never heard before he retreated.

When he got back to the base camp he did some research. First he found a report of a solar panel being stolen about 16 months ago. Then he found a hunters report about activity around the area where he found the clearing. He also found out no body had checked out the complaint.

Calling his supervisor they organized a group to visit this area. The next day they headed out to investigate. What they found was unexplainable . Everything was like he explained but where he had marked one of trees that mark was 2 feet higher. Then when they went into woods they found paw prints of what they thought was a Bobcat . But it was a print like they had never seen before 6 toes and twice the size of a normal Bobcat. 

Then they heard the chattering of a squirrel. They looked up and saw this Huge animal coming out of tree at top speed. One of the Ranger took his gun out and shot. It was a direct hit the offending animal landed just feet from the Ranger. He retrieved the animal it was the largest squirrel he had ever seen. The group decided to head back and discuss the situation.

They sent the body of the squirrel to be examined. When all the facts were discussed it was decided the solar panel was causing the changes.  The area around the panel was emitting not only heat but a low hum. They consulted with the engineers of the solar farm and arranged to remove the panel.

A month later when the panel was removed the area had changed more growth just plain strange. The work crew decided it would be easier to remove the panel by loading it  on a boat and taking it back closer to site. One crew stayed behind and cleared the area but were amazed at the size of the earthworms they discovered.

On the way out of the woods they crossed path of one large rabbit.

This trip gave them so much material for stories.

It has been over six months so a group headed back to see the area .

There had been no new growth the  area seemed back to normal.

 But the reports of larger animals still surfaced i mean the animals were not going back to normal but they were not getting larger. The reports of the aggressive large gar continued. Soon there was a bounty set on the Gar to rid the Hatchie of the creatures.

If you are wandering in the Hatchie Bottoms beware..

Was that Walter?

was that Walter?

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here is one of the many ghost stories of the area around the Hatchie River

The ghost story of the ferry at Hatchie bottom and the drowning

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here is a little know Haywood Co fact:

KOKO: Located about on Highway 76 about 3 miles south of Hatchie River. It’sproximity to Lowery’s Landing at the river made it a busy area in earlier days.

Some say Koko was named for a popular brand of chewing gum.

As people were leaving Brownsville to cross the Hatchie River to go to Somerville the only way to cross was by Ferry. The Ferry was a flat bottom boat with two oarsman. Some time they would have mules on each side of the river with robes attached to pull the ferry across.

On this one day the ferry had a small wagon full of goods heading from a Brownsville merchant to one of the farms 2 miles from the river . The driver of the wagon was Walter he had worked at the mercantile delivering all around Haywood Co. for years. Walter was a beloved character around Brownsville and Haywood Co. When fall came around he would put on his Beaver hat and cowhide coat. The other thing he was known for was his crazy snorting laugh he just made people smile.

When he delivered across the river he would spend the night and return the next day . He would always tell people he was happiest around the Hatchie River and with the people of the bottoms.

One of Walter’s habits was when he got on the ferry he would unhook the horse from the wagon. He would always say if the water got rough the horse could swim. On this afternoon it was said there was an erie sound and all of sudden the water became disturbed and the wagon was flipped off the ferry. The horse swam back to the shore and headed back to Brownsville . The ferrymen were still on the rocking ferry but nobody could find Walter. They got back to shore and for some reason the wagon had been pushed on shore. Then the search began soon they were joined by men of the community.

The horse turned back up in Brownsville about the time the word reached the town about the incident. Several of the town’s men headed to the river to help look for Walter. They searched for hours finally they were able to find his hat and his coat but that was all. They went into the woods looking for signs of Walter but when they came back to retrieve the coat and hat they were gone.

Nobody had any idea why the water had acted so weird. Then the story got out it was an evil spirit in the river, the truth was Haywood Co had experienced an earthquake.

They finally gave up on finding Walter and held his funeral.

A month after the accident the sighting began . It was reported fisherman would hear Walter’s laugh and see him walking along the river bank. For the years that the ferry was in operation a ferryman would report they felt his presence on the boat. After the bridge was constructed the sightings did not stop. Even now it has been reported a fisherman would see a man walking the banks. They would go to wave but he would be seen walking toward a big tree then disappear. Then the hunters would tell stories of seeing a man walking and hear his strange laugh. They could not help but smile. When the hunters looked up the man would be walking into a tree disappearing and a face would appear in the bark of the tree. When the lumbermen came for some reason they would never touch that tree. The tree continued to grow but the face stayed put not moving.

Many say as they approached the tree they see a smiling face in the bark of tree. The story has been passed down and many have heard the laugh and visited the tree and smiled. Walter is still walking the banks of the Hatchie and then disappearing into his tree. He is happy at his home in Hatchie Bottom

The story of the Sand Dunes

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Can you hear the drums?

Sitting on the top of the sand dunes above the Hatchie River the boys could hear the drums. The year was 1918 and the story was started.  

For years it had been said if you visited the sand dunes off the Somerville Highway in the fall you would hear the drums of the hunting parties. 

Several Indian tribes used the Hatchie Bottoms as hunting grounds for years recorded as early as the 13th century.They would set up hunting camps along the River and hunt during early morning. The lands were full of deer, Buffalo, bear and other animals good for food and hides to trade.  They  would celebrate their hunts while processing the meat and tanning the hides. While they did this they would sound the drums,play the flute and sing.

The white man were not a problem the ones they did deal with   were traders and explorers. No threat…

As time passed the Indians lost their hunting ground to the white man. The hunting parties were gone but the spirits  of the elders stayed around.  It was also said the lands of the Bottoms had a few burial mounds. That contained the remains of ones who passed while on the hunting journey.

Sitting on the top of the sand dunes above the Hatchie River the boys could hear the drums. The year was 1918 and the story was started.

The boys had heard about the sounds and the phantom fires that were said to dot the landscape. 

Peter,John Paul, and Mason trusted Peter’s father so they told him their plans. He just smiled since his wife and daughters were visiting her sister in Brownsville he helped them pack some food,  a shovel  , a small lantern and quilts. Off they were to the Dunes. They set up their camp ,dug a pit for a fire, spread their quilt out.

Before  sunset the music and singing could be heard  . As dark fell they saw the fires then it happened out of nowhere a shadow appeared on the edge of the woods.

The  moon was full there were no shadows  then the arrow landed just a few feet away and a wild scream was heard.

The boys took off Peter put out the fire and caught up with John Paul and Mason  running all the way home. They opened the window to Peter’s room. The father had sat up because he knew they would be home before the night was over. He looked in Peter’s room and could see the shapes of the 3 boys under the cover . The father got up early and made breakfast  the boys appeared after cleaning up. Soon they were telling their story.  He did not doubt them he hooked up the small wagon and took  them to where they had camped to pick up their stuff . Sure enough there was the remainder of the food they had brought and evidence where their camp fire had been . Where they said the  arrow had been were 3 arrow heads and a large rabbit foot that looked like  it had just been cut off a rather large rabbit.

The father gathered up the objects and told the boys not to say anything to anyone.

Yea sure , the story was passed down at many a campfire.

Are the spirits still there ? Can you still hear the drums?

SPIRITS OF HATCHIE STATION

THE SPIRITS OF HATCHIE STATION

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Let’s go back in time when the Chickasaw Indians were using the Hatchie Bottoms as their hunting and summer camping grounds.

In the 1600’s before the settlers came to West Tennessee this area was rich in wildlife. For example there were bears, wildcats, deer just to  name a few. We know this for a fact because of the diaries of the fur traders that traveled the area to buy the hides from the various tribes. Another little known fact is there are several Indian mounds scattered across the area around the Hatchie Bottoms on the Madison County side as well as the Haywood County side.

Back to the spirits of Hatchie Station some of the earliest stories are of the drums and mysterious camp fires,

Mr Charlie Luke told me the story about on more than one occasion since he had been living on the bank of the river he would hear  the drums. He said he would close his eyes imaging the campsite where the men of the tribe were  butchering their daily harvest of game. While the men did this the women would be cooking and preparing to cure the meat. The spirits of these hunters still can  be felt as you watch the river flow past under the old bridge. 

 Time passes soon come the settlers and gone are the Indians. Now the flat bottom boats and wagons  loaded with families and their dreams of making a home. There was also sorry many young children and elderly died on the journey. Around this area there were grave sites. Some of the spirts wander the area wondering where they are and where are their families.

Next came the ferry that connected Haywood Co to Madison Co and the steamboats that navigated the Hatchie river carrying goods and passengers. At Hatchie Station there was a “turnaround” for the big boats. The spirits from this era are the two young children that fell off the ferry and drown. They have been seen playing in the river or running around the banks playing tag and laughing. 

Then there was the gambler that got thrown off a riverboat for cheating. It was said he got thrown off the boat about a 1/3 mile down from Hatchie Station.  His body was found  on the Haywood Co side he can be seen pacing and heard cursing when there is a full moon..

These are just some of the spirits that float around Hatchie Station but you have to remember ghosts let special people to see them.

Have you ever felt or seen a ghost?

BACKGROUND ON HATCHIE STATION BRIDGE

I was asked to send this story out before I tell you about the ghost and spirits of the bridge…

Original story appeared in Downtown Wanderings Memories and More. d n english 2006

HATCHIE STATION BRIDGE

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In 1928 the State of Tennessee contracted to build a steel bridge across the Hatchie River at Hatchie Station. This bridge replace the ferry that once connected Madison Co. to Haywood Co close to the Hillville Community.

The bridge was a steel frame with a wood plank floor by early 1930 the bridge was open to all traffic.

It made the trip from Jackson to Memphis easier.

Then came Highway 138 the bridge was in disrepair and the road in Haywood Co. was not maintain since they had  alternate route( Highway 70) to Jackson.

Mr. Charlie Luke told me he and his wife were the last car to cross the bridge. He would get out and moved boards to be able to cross the bridge to reach his home at Hatchie Station.

Then on the morning of Feb. 26, 1946 a neighbor lady went into labor. The men of the community got together and removed the remaining boards off the bridge to fill in a low part of 138 so her husband to get the hospital in Jackson. 

This good deed was the death toll for the bridge. The state did not want to rebuild the bridge since they now had “good” highways. Since Haywood Co actually owned the bridge they had no interest rebuilding the bridge or maintain the roads in the Hatchie Bottoms. Mr. Charlie laughed “that my dear is why I call it the bridge that goes nowhere.”

Mr. Luke gave me the telephone number of the Mullen family. Mrs Mullen was the lady that  was in labor that day.

I called and Bill Mullen answered the phone and I told him the reason for calling. He started laughing and then  informed me his mother at age 96 was still with us.

“But I can tell you about this since it is a part of my history.” He said .

He went on to tell me he was that bundle of joy that came into the world that day. “So believe me the neighbors and my family have told me this story.”We talked for about an hour with him telling what it was like to grow up in his community. 

Now the frame of the bridge just stands there feeling the Hatchie flowing underneath it’s empty floor.

Let’s do imagine this- imagine the bridge being brought back to life. The frame checked out and repaired then the floor being replaced. On the Haywood County side repair the road to the bridge making it a walking and bike trail.

Then at the bridge create a picnic area  continuing on  the trail to Estanaula Landing. Can you imagine what it would be like to experience the true beauty of the Hatchie River Bottom.

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Photo Dr Danny Winbush 2006
 

A FALL ADVENTURE

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Let’s take a Fall road trip.

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Fall is such a special time of year the brisk air, the beautiful colors and just the winding down of the year. There are so many special places to visit inside Madison County.

If you have not had the chance to visit Denmark, Tn now would be the perfect time to visit.  This area is the home of the historical Denmark  Presbyterian  Church and the cemetery located down the lane beside the church.

This church is also the home of the ghost choir now they have Mr. Billy King visiting to play the organ. Now before you start shaking your head let me tell you a story.

The Denmark Presbyterian Church has seen the men and women of the community go off to war since the Civil War. Reading the historic marker on the lawn of the church you find out some of the history.

This church, built by slaves in 1854, played a significant role in Madison County’s Civil War experiences. In April 1861, days after the firing on Fort Sumter, South Carolina, 104 local men formed a company called The Danes, later part of the 6th Tennessee Infantry (CSA). The community gathered here at the church to watch the new soldiers muster before they left for Camp Beauregard in nearby Jackson. At the ceremony, Emma Cobb presented a silk flag with the company’s name to Capt. John Ingram.

On the eve of the Battle of Britton Lane on August 31, 1862, the 20th and 30th Illinois Infantry Regiments commanded by Col. Elias S. Dennis camped in a grove of mulberry trees near the church. After the battle, Confederate Gen. Frank C. Armstrong’s cavalry brigade spent the night in Denmark on its return south. The Confederates kept their prisoners on the church’s second floor, which was a Masonic Lodge. Inscriptions believed to have been written by these Federal soldiers can still be seen along the bottoms of the walls.”

 Now with that bit of history out of the way let me tell you about the ghosts.

For years people have been reporting as the pass the Church at night if they slowed down as they pass music could be heard. When the members of the

 Big Black Creek Historical Association started restoring the church even durning the construction the music could be heard.

As the church came back to life more stories surfaced mysterious lights , singing and people talking. The upstairs now back to a Masonic lodge before they restored it if you went up the stairs you could feel a presence. 

But let’s talk about the sanctuary and the choir Mr Billy King was the leader in overseeing the construction and making sure everything was historically  accurate. Soon an organ and piano were positioned up front. Now true you could go by and Mr. Billy would be playing the old fashion “church” music. 

But long after he had left the church you could here the choir and see the mystery lights still can. Since Mr Billy’s death it has been said you can hear him playing the organ for the choir and I bet “ Miss Judy” is sitting on the first pew.

Down the lane beside the church you can find the cemetery one of the first that Mr. Billy oversaw the clean up and restoration. This cemetery was one of first  sites of a fund raiser for  Big Black Creek Historical Association. Members of the community would dress in period pieces and tell the stories of the citizens buried in this cemetery. While they did that I would be sitting by the church telling history and ghost stories. 

As they were cleaning up after the fund raiser different people would see lights coming from the back corner of the cemetery. Some of the men went to check it out.  No one there. One of the older men of the community was sitting by me on the trailer they had used to take people back to the cemetery.

“Honey, them men are not going find anyone.” He laughed “that’s just some young man attempting to find his way home after being buried in the unknown grave. I live down the road I been seeing that light at night for as long as I can remember.”

 As far as I know that light can still be seen.

Why don’t you take time and visit the Denmark area while you are in the area check out the Mercer neighborhood . If you are there enjoy a meal at Papa Daddy’s check out their Facebook page for hours of operation and menu.